Do you have a gated property? Here’s what you need to know.

Many property owners and rural communities have installed gate systems to keep their homes and businesses secure and safe. While these gates are a deterrent for rural crime, they can also impede on emergency personnel from getting to you easily, should the need arise. Lacombe County Fire Chief Drayton Bussiere says that with some pre-planning, residents can have peace of mind knowing they are accessible in emergencies.

"We encourage anyone with a gate to make a plan which allows fire trucks, ambulances, and other emergency vehicles to access their property – without being impeded by a gate,” Bussiere said.

If residents are planning to install gates on their properties, consideration is needed on how emergency vehicles will be allowed to enter the property, without being slowed down by the gate. Having this discussion with your gate provider, and exploring the different options, will go a long way to avoid unnecessary delays, and damage to a gate if forced entry is required.

Using CPTED - Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design – principles to protect property

Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (pronounced SEP-TED) is a proactive approach to reduce crime by shifting the focus from the criminal element to that of the environment which the potential victim lives and works.

CPTED is defined as the proper design and effective use of the built environment that can lead to a reduction in the fear and incidence of crime and an improvement in the quality of life. It is based on three strategies: Natural Surveillance, Natural Access Control, and Territorial Reinforcement. Lacombe County has several trained CPTED inspectors who will come out to any Lacombe County property to provide an assessment and provide tips on incorporating CPTED principles.

If you have any questions for Lacombe County, or to book a CPTED inspection, please call 403.782.8959.